Category Archives: Policies and Ofsted

Intellectual Freedom: policy consultation

As a of CILIP School Libraries Group you can help us develop CILIP’s policy and supporting guidance on intellectual freedom for librarians, library workers and information professionals in all sectors by adding your feedback and knowledge to this survey. Complete the survey.

If you’re a member of a CILIP Member Network, Special Interest Group, Diversity Network or Devolved Nation help us develop CILIP’s policy and supporting guidance on intellectual freedom for librarians, library workers and information professionals in all sectors by adding your feedback and knowledge to this survey.

Counter-extremism in schools: the new PREVENT guidance

In a bid to tackle the phenomenon of radicalisation, the government has passed  the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 which affects every school in the country. In a matter of weeks, every school has been asked to provide clear safeguarding measures to address radicalisation: this is called the PREVENT action which comes with clear guidance for school and school staff.

The guidance is clear that:

  • Extremism and radicalisation are safeguarding concerns and should be dealt with using the school’s existing safeguarding procedures.
  • Schools must ensure that children understand the ‘diverse…religious and ethnic identities in the UK’
  • The Prevent duty does not require teachers to carry out unnecessary intrusion into family life

There are 5 themes within the Prevent duty:

  • Risk assessment: There is no single way to identify a young person who is at risk. Small changes in behaviour might indicate there are concerns about their wellbeing so members of staff MUST refer anything to the Designated Lead for Safeguarding who can then carry out a risk assessment
  • Working in partnership: every school should work in partnership with the Police. There is a telephone helpline for extremism 020 7340 7264. If you a member of staff is concerned that a child’s life is in immediate danger, or that they may be planning to travel to Syria / Iraq dial 999 or call the confidential Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321
  • Staff training: whole staff training is to be carried out in every school on this issue.
  • IT policies: Staff should develop an awareness of online risks and how extremists use social media to engage with young people. Every teacher needs to be aware of the online activity of extremist and terrorist groups
  • Building resilience to radicalisation: In all lessons, teaching, support teaching and non-teaching staff should seek to offer a ‘safe environment’ to explore sensitive or controversial topics

Use of Social Media by ISIS/ISIL and similar groups

As with other online harms, every member of staff needs to be aware of the risks posed by the online activity of extremist and terrorist groups. Keeping children safe from risks posed by terrorist exploitation of social media should be approached in the same way as safeguarding children from any other online abuse. In the same way that staff are vigilant about signs of possible physical or emotional abuse in any of their pupils, if you have a concern for the safety of a specific young person at risk of radicalisation, you should follow the school safeguarding procedures and report your concern to Elga Stuck (Designated Lead.

ISIL media presents ISIL as the powerful creators of a new state.. When ISIL’s official media groups release material online the group encourages supporters on social media to share the material – this is what gives ISIL its large reach, particularly to young people.

  • ISIL celebrates and promotes an image of success online in order to attract young people – it tells them that ISIL are winning side and offer an exciting life.
  • ISIL portray their ‘Caliphate’ as an ideal, utopian state where Muslims will find status and belonging.
  • ISIL insists that it is the personal duty of Sunni Muslims to support them and travel to the ‘Caliphate’.
  • ISIL portrays itself as the only group able to defend Sunnis from the Assad regime, the Iraqi army or the threat of the West.

ISIL uses:

  • Facebook: ISIL supporters use this to share content, such as news stories and YouTube videos, among their peer groups.
  • Twitter: There are a large number of pro-ISIL accounts sharing ISIL propaganda.
  • You Tube: This is used to host videos, both of official ISIL output and videos created by users themselves. Users post YouTube links in Twitter and Facebook.
  • Ask FM: FM People considering travel to Syria or Iraq use Ask.fm to ask British jihadis and female ISIL supporters about travel, living standards, recruitment, fighting and broader ideology. The answers given by ISIL supporters are encouraging, saying all their difficulties will be solved if they travel to the region.
  • Instagram: This is used by fighters and ISIL supporters to share the photosets frequently produced by various ISIL media organisations. ISIL supporters also use Instagram to share pictures of their life in Syria, often showing landscapes and images suggesting they are living a full and happy life.
  • Tumblr: This is exploited by fighters to promote longer, theological arguments for travel. Tumblr is popular with female ISIL supporters, who have written blogs addressing the concerns girls have about travelling to the region, such as leaving their families behind and living standards in Syria.

PM: On social media, ISIL supporters frequently encourage others to message them on closed peer-to-peer networks when asked for sensitive information, such as on how to travel to the region, what to pack and who to contact when they arrive. Popular private messaging apps include WhatsApp, Kik, SureSpot and Viber.

How can school librarians support the school agenda in this?

Our recommended resources include:

Counter-Extremism (narratives and conversations), an open-access video database put together by the London Grid for Learning

Inspire, a counter-extremism and women’ rights organisation lead by Sara Khan

 

Stock check issue: have you got the right exam board textbooks in your library?

With the recent changes in the National Curriculum, it is more important than ever to ensure that your library has the right textbooks and revision guides for all the subjects taught in school.

An efficient and effective way to keep track of all these changes is to approach a member of teaching staff in every department with a quick tick list of all the exam boards available in their subject. It is absolutely guaranteed that they will be able to tick straightaway the exam board used by their department. Conducting a stock check of all your textbooks and purchasing the most appropriate ones has never been easier!

Where can you find all the information about the exam boards?

I have also discovered a very useful feature of the new Browns Books for Students website which is very useful: in the Curriculum section, they have created a new area called “New Curriculum” in order to keep all the new resources separate from the old ones. In here you can find not only the titles of all the new textbooks and revision guides by subject but also the new set English Literature texts. The also have a feature that I have been using a lot which lists suggestions for support reading for GCSE and A-Level subjects alongside ideas for wider reading and teacher resources.

To get you started, you can find below a list of the exam boards for some of the most common subjects for GCSE, AS and A-Level. Give it a try!

GCSEs

English Language: AQA , OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

English Literature: AQA, OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

Maths: AQA, OCR, Pearson

 

AS AND A-LEVELS

Art & Design

AS: AQA, OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

A-Level: AQA, OCR

Biology

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR A, OCR B, Pearson A, Pearson B

Business Studies

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

Chemistry

AS: OCR

Computer Science

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, WJEC Eduqas

Economics

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, Pearson A, Pearson B, WJEC Eduqas

English Language

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

English Language and Literature

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

English Literature

AS: AQA A, AQA B, OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

A level: OCR, Pearson, WJEC Eduqas

History

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, Pearson

Psychology

AS: AQA

A-Level: AQA, OCR

Physics

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR A, OCR B, Pearson

Sociology

AS + A-Level: AQA, OCR, WJEC Eduqas

 

The Beating Heart of the School – a London & SE SLG course

heart image copyright free

On Friday 14th November 2014, SLG London and South East committee hosted a training course to attempt to deal with some of the issues facing school librarians. This event was inspired by issues raised in the APPG document published in May 2014; The Beating Heart of the School. This is a summary of the key elements of the course.

Post written by Dawn Finch

The Beating Heart document has highlighted both the need for a professional librarian in schools, and the need of schools to have a more enlightened view of what exactly a school librarian does. Sadly it seems from their findings that in schools there is still a very archaic view of the abilities of school librarians, and this can hinder how much they are able to be part of the higher level or management structure of the school. Ultimately this can have a directly negative effect on pupil progress, and is essentially a misuse of valuable resources.

In the course we discussed how a successful and ‘outstanding’ school library is such an integral part of the school that its influence reaches far beyond its walls. It simply is not possible to be a “Beating Heart” if the pump does not have the strength to reach every limb! So how do we break out beyond our walls? We have all done every event and reading initiative we can think of, and taken part in every scheme and promotion we can – but most of us are still finding it hard to keep a high profile, and to increase the number of our loyal users.

One of the most successful strategies for creating extended loyalty for the school library is to engage in certain branding activities; make a logo, create a theme, decide what image you want to represent for your library and be persistent and consistent with your promotion of the library. Our aim should be that as soon as anyone sees our logo, they should have an instant understanding of what we represent, and of what a library can do for them. Branding is recognition in a heartbeat, and recognition creates loyalty. What we are looking to do is create a feeling, an emotion, and ultimately loyalty.

On the day we also looked at the issues surrounding digital literacy. The days of ICT skills in schools has passed, and school librarians are now at the front-line of the teaching of digital literacy. We live in a world of cyber-crime and cyber-bullying and our children’s best defence of this is knowledge and understanding. We cannot expect our children to protect themselves online, or to behave well, if we do not model good behaviour in schools. To this end we need to be using social media and blogging just as they do, but to use it to show young people how it should be done.

There are many arguments against the use of social media in schools but, as Ofsted are increasingly saying, it will soon not be possible for schools to achieve an outstanding rating if they fall behind in digital literacy. The fact remains that some of the finest resources available for researchers are now in blog form. To deny use of blogs and blogging in schools is to deny access to some of the most accurate first-hand resources available. This denial will also act as a kind of exclusion policy exposing the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ in the classroom.  If we do not allow our pupils access to blogs for information and research, we are simply encouraging unreliable wiki-research and creating a two-tier system of work.

As an example, let’s look at the landing of Philae on Comet 67P. Pupils researching this historic event can read Wikipedia, or newspaper reports, but how much better is it to access the blog of the European Space Agency and subscribe to their updates?

How about if your pupils are studying fashion? During London Fashion Week they might be able to find a newspaper report about the week, or even some smaller articles on the official site. How much better would it be to follow the accredited blog of a young designer as they go through the process for the first time?

Then we should take into account the fabulous resources that we have at our fingertips to protect our own service. How would we have access to articles like this one by Phillip Ardagh about the importance of libraries if we did not access blogs? We are not even touching on the importance of Twitter and other social media as a vital communication tool, but needless to say it is all part of the same move towards a digitally literate society.

The issue of cyber-bulling and trolling is at the top of many schools’ agendas, and is often an excuse used to prevent access to social media sites. This can lead to failings in how children perceive social-media, and failings in how schools deal with cyber-bullying issues. The children that I have supported through these issues still complain that school doesn’t “believe it’s real.” Pupils often complain that adults (including teachers) still insist that the hurt felt from online insults and persecution is not real. They are often still told that they should “get over it” or “forget it” or “ignore it.”  It is very real, and the key to preventing it is to first accept the reality of it. The “sticks and stones” line is dated and insulting. If you hit me with a stick, I’ll heal. If you cut me down with savage words I may carry those scars for the rest of my life. Embracing the hurt is the first step to preventing it from happening, and the first step towards stopping your pupils from behaving in this way themselves. The next step is using social media in lessons and as an educational tool.

We, as school librarians, have a duty to provide what our pupils need, and that is information in any form and format. We should do this by using social media in both our communication methods, and in our service to our young learners. By staying at the cutting edge, and using every tool at our disposal, we will future-proof our service whilst providing what our pupils need to fully progress as both informed learners, and socially well-adjusted adults.

Course delivered by Dawn Finch

Literacy and school library consultant, writer of children’s fiction and non-fiction books.

www.dawnfinch.com

Footnote; we will be revisiting elements of this course in much greater details, including supporting EPQs, in our April LibMeet as well as our Summer 2015 training courses. Follow this blog for more information. If you are a CILIP member you can log in and see our events posted here.

All of our events are open to both CILIP members and non-members, but if you are a member the cost of events will be lower.



Documents referred to on this training course can be downloaded by using the links below;

The Beating Heart of the School – APPG report on school librarieshttp://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/advocacy-campaigns-awards/advocacy-campaigns/libraries-all-party-parliamentary-group/beating

Moving English Forward – Ofsted

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/moving-english-forward

National Curriculum for English (2014/2015)  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-english-programmes-of-study

 

 

Essential Training

Educational Attainment and School Libraries

Is your library at the Heart of the School?

Date & Time:
Friday, 14 November 2014 – 10:00am to 4:00pm

Inspired by the recent CILIP report of the same name, this training day will explore the answers to key questions:
– Does your library service meet school priorities?
– Is it responsive to user needs?
– Are all your users aware of the services you offer?
– How can you ensure your service provides value for money and
supports school objectives?

The course will explore how you can make an impact within your organisation and promote your service to school stakeholders. Through practical examples and the application of case studies, delegates will discover how to ensure that the impact of their service on teaching and learning attainment is both visible and strategically aligned with school priorities.

Programme

An interactive programme will facilitate learning through a series of lectures, discussions and exercises. Participants will have the opportunity to interact with professionals from different schools and libraries where fresh perspectives may be revealed and reviewed.

Participants will:
– Explore practical ways to raise the visibility and educational impact of their service.
– Reflect on the features of an outstanding school library.
– Consider the strengths and weaknesses of their own service.
– Understand the benefits of social media and how to apply them in a school environment to positively impact pupil development both inside and outside the library.
– Learn how social media and blogs can be used to effectively brand the school library and improve communication with parents, students and staff and raise awareness of the library.

Speakers

Dawn Finch

Dawn Finch is a literacy and reader development consultant and vice-chair of the London & South East School Libraries Group. With 25 years of experience in both school and public libraries, Dawn’s career in training and library development includes working for the UK’s top training companies. She has done extensive research on the implications of the National Curriculum and the Framework for Literacy on library services, has worked with many schools in establishing and managing an effective school library and is active in reading and literacy campaigns. Dawn’s portfolio also includes delivering creative writing workshops to children. A published author, Dawn is a member of both the Society of Authors and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.
Address:
CILIP HQ

7 Ridgmount Street

WC1E 7AE London, LND

United Kingdom

Contact Details

Amanda Berrisford
020 7307 8700

Booking Information

Event Cost:
CILIP Members: £96 (£80 +VAT)
Non-Members: £115.20 (96+VAT)

Library and Information Sector Subject Tags

Event Format

– See more at: http://www.cilip.org.uk/events/educational-attainment-and-school-libraries#sthash.M0Gu5dGZ.dpuf