Category Archives: Networking

CILIP Conference 2022 – Day 2

Back at the Liverpool Exhibition Centre for the second day at CILIP Conference, starting with a really thought-provoking keynote from Prof Jacqueline McGlade talking about sustainable development and knowledge systems.

Librarians rule!

The takeaway message for me was that we need to map our networks and reimagine what we mean by beloning. Prof McGlade quoted Simone Weil, ‘To be rooted is perhaps the most important and least recognized need of the human soul.’

Morning sessions included a workshop on Censorship and Intellectual Freedom – a follow up to Thursday afternoon’s collaboration session, and a session on evidencing impact using the IFLA Storytelling Manual.

After lunch and a quick speed dating session of the Member Networks, there was a really great workshop on allyship led by John Vincent and Shirley Yarwood Jackson. We looked at what makes a good ally, what the barriers are, and what support is needed to overcome them. There was a really supportive environment, focused on the importance of standing in the gap in support of minority groups and recognising that EDI is not a tick box exercise but a journey, not a destnation. Sadly we also need to realise that progress made is being eroded.

The final session was a celebration from CILIP President Kate Robinson, highlighting that our strength is in our community, and #WeAreCILIP.  Our bursary winner Hannah was invited on stage to say what CILIP membership has given her as she has turned an empty classroom into a library that is at the heart of the school.

Keeping connected and keeping learning have been the main messages throughout Conference this year as we recover from Covid. Removing barriers and widening participation through CILIP Pathways and Apprenticeships is really important, and I’m really keen to help school librarians gain academic and professional qualifications that will bring them in to the wider library and information profession.

A great two days, and a lot to take in, but fantastic to feel part of a wider community.  As Hannah says, ‘Librarians rule!’ #WeAreCILIP.

Join today and be part of the wider profession #WeAreCILIP

CILIP Conference 2022

CILIP Conference at the Liverpool Exhibition Centre

A fantastic first day at CILIP Conference in Liverpool, starting with an inspirational keynote from Sayf Al Ashqar who rebuilt the Central Library at the University of Mosul after it was destroyed by ISIS. His comment that “the soul returned to the Library when the students came back”. He is now working to rebuild school libraries in Iraq.

Rebuilding and renewal is a theme running through Conference as we return to ‘normal’ after the pandemic.

Charlotte and Nick on the SLG stand at #CILIPConf22

Sessions throughout the day focused on EDI, Health Literacy, Intellectual Freedon and Censoship an Decolonising the Curriculum.

The final keynote from Krystal Vittles was indpirational. She set out that as librarians we have a profession, we are professionals, and we show professionalism in what we do.

It was great to meet so many people from CILIP HQ and school librarians including our rep Charlotte and our bursary winner Hannah. It was great to meet face to face and be surrounded by librarians from all sectors. We finished off with a fantastic evening reception at the Museum of Liverpool.

Day 1 over – and looking forward to Day 2. You can follow us @CILIPSLG #CILIPConf22.

CILIP Conference 2022

Nick and Charlotte from the SLG Committee and Hannah, our bursary winner, are excited to be a this year’s CILIP Conference and Expo on 7+8 July at Liverpool Exhibition Centre.

Come and see us on our stand where we will be talking about the work that we have been doing to promote school libraries and school librarians as we recover from lockdown. We have an exciting programme of webinars to support CPD and professional registration, and we can let you know about our SLG Conference 2023!

If you can’t be there this year, we will be tweeting throughout the two days as library and information professionals from all sectors will be sharing their experiences and knowledge. You can follow us @CILIPSLG #CILIPConf22.

This year’s focus is on how libraries can approach the challenges of the climate crisis, tackle misinformation and censorship, explore equalities, diversity and inclusion, as well as the consultation around CILIP’s new Intellectual Freedom policy.

Don’t forget to come and say hello!

Reading the Planet: Libraries in a Changing ClimateSheffield /16-18 SEP 2022

YLG Conference returns in the real and in the virtual

Following COP26 the conference theme could not be more topical. Young people’s activism around the environment, climate change and more generally on societal change, gives us all hope for the future.

YLG will be offering a virtual programme for those who cannot travel/afford the full conference. Those who sign up for the live conference will be able to access the virtual sessions for free.

Find out more:

https://www.cilip.org.uk/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1630249&group=&dm_i=6WFS%2C662O%2CEGVR3%2CPUX5%2C1

CILIP Conference 2022 Bursary Offer

CILIP SLG are delighted to be able to offer one full delegate place at this year’s CILIP Conference + Expo 2022, with one night’s free accommodation as a bursary place.

CILIP Conference + Expo

The CILIP Conference + Expo 2022 is taking place at the Liverpool Exhibition Centre on Thursday 7th and Friday 8th July and is one of the largest and most eagerly anticipated events in the library and information sector. For the first time in three years, the event will be in person, and we will be taking advantage of all the benefits of meeting face-to-face. The sessions will encourage free-flowing conversations, collaborations with like-minded professionals, the sharing of ideas and experiences, as well as being packed with practical tips and inspiring presentations.

CILIP Conference + Expo brings together around 500 professionals from across the sector to share experiences, knowledge and expertise. The keynote speakers include Professor Jacqueline McGlade, Sayf Al Ashqar, and Vanessa Kisuule. The programme is being finalised but you can see an outline of the session content here. Keep up to date by following @CILIPConf22

CILIP SLG will have a stand in the Exhibition Hall, so please come and say hello, find out about our event schedule and see you can get involved with our projects.

CILIP SLG Bursary Offer

Our sponsored bursary offer is for:

  • 1 x complimentary full conference delegate place* with 1 nights’ accommodation at the Jury’s Inn for a member of CILIP Schools Libraries Group.

    * a full conference delegate place includes attendance at both days of the conference (Thursday and Friday), access to all sessions, refreshment breaks and lunches and ticket to drinks reception on July 7.  Travel to and from the Conference will not be included.

How to apply

To submit your application for the bursary place, the criteria is as follows:

  • We expect you to write a piece for our magazine, School Libraries in View (SLiV) about your conference experience of approximately 800-1000 words. SLiV will be published in October 2022, deadline for your copy will be August 31, 2022.
  • We expect you be active on social media, and you will be tweeting from the Conference, including @CILIPSLG in your tweets.  Please include your twitter name in your application.
  • Please send your application to Chair.slg@cilip.org.uk containing the following information:  Your name, name of your school, Your CILIP number, and why you feel that attending Conference will benefit you and your school. 

Applications to be received by Friday, April 22 2022.

We are particularly interested to receive applications from members who have never been to the CILIP Conference + Expo before, and who wouldn’t ordinarily be able to go.  This will be an excellent chance for Chartership candidates to enhance their applications.

Alternatively, Early Bird discounts are available until May 27, and you can book these directly on the cilipconference.org.uk website. Remember to log in to the CILIP website before booking so that it recognises your membership status and offers you the correct delegate rate.

Reading Rocks event, October 2016

From time to time, SLG is asked to send representatives to different events around the country to speak or to set up a stand.  This involved us getting involved with a stand in the ATL Conference earlier in the year, being represented and giving a talk to a Headteachers’ Teachmeet in the summer, and the Reading Rocks event this autumn.  Lucy Chambers from the committee attended this event, and wrote her report for us.  Every meeting we attend is a chance for us to interact with people we wouldn’t normally reach, and to spread the word about the great things school libraries are doing.

Lucy writes: ‘I attended the first one day Reading Rocks 2016 conference, established to ‘discuss ways to make reading rock for every pupil.’  near Warrington, to deliver a workshop on behalf of SLG.  This was an opportunity to speak at an event aimed at teachers rather than just librarians and is something the committee has been discussing for some time: how to cross the invisible barrier and promote the impact librarians can have on a school to educationalists.

The District CE Primary School in Newton-le-Willows has won awards for its approach to reading and has many inspirational reading areas, from several small libraries within the school to a Story Shack, a book-themed playground and a Little Library of books for parents.   They promote reading with stylish and interactive displays and regular reading events throughout the year.

My role was to advocate the value of school librarians, in this case in primary schools, and to promote SLG.  I also spoke about how I use regular Reading Year events to get children reading in my four schools in Tower Hamlets.  The day was devoted to literacy sessions of interest to primary school teachers, with several authors and promoters of reading schemes. Keynote speakers included James Clements, the founder of Shakespeare and More, who works with schools to develop the teaching of reading, and Mat Tobin, Senior Lecturer in English and Children’s Literature at Oxford Brookes’ School of Education, talking about the hidden messages in picture books , including a thought-provoking interpretation of ‘Not Now Bernard’, elicited with discussion from Year 1 to Year 6 pupils.

Workshops ranged from sessions promoting First News, Phoenix and other magazines to a project using rhythm and music to improve reading comprehension in low ability children. Other workshops included storyteller Dan Worsely, Into Film, Mat Tobin, Jonny Duddle and Nikki Heath.

Altogether, it was a very impressive event with some excellent speakers, a great range of exhibitors and an ambitious programme.  If you are a primary school librarian or teacher, look out for Reading Rocks 2017 and sign up!’

See the school’s website www.district.st-helens.sch.uk/ for further information

 

SLG Regional Event in Kent/SE London

CILIPSLG held one of its very successful Regional Training Days at Eltham College in South East London on October 24th.  The day was heavily over-subscribed, and there are plans to rerun the day next March for all those who were disappointed this time.  Like all of the training days, there was an eclectic mix of subjects, and everyone found something to interest them in the day.

The first speaker was Caroline Roche, who also hosted us in her Library at Eltham College.  Caroline also runs Heart of the School website. She talked about using technology to help the learners in your school, and EPQ students in particular.  She showcased Diigo, MySimpleShow and Animoto, and gave out practical How To worksheets after her talk.

Next came Matt Imrie from Farrington’s School.  Matt runs the very successful Teen Librarian newsletter and website.  Matt talked to us about Freenocomics – how to get stuff for your library for free, and how to encourage your students to blog about books.

Last speaker before lunch was Maggie Thomas from Bacon’s College.  Maggie told us about a radical refurbishment of her library which involved her in strategic thinking and planning, including a review of how she should be line managed.  She had amazing support from her Line Manager throughout the successful process.

During lunch there was a great opportunity to network, and also to play the newly published Murder in the Library from BoxClever Education.  Alex Gillespie, an English teacher who devised the game, set it out in Eltham College Library, and we were all encouraged to find out who had murdered the Library Assistant!  This was an excellent game involving deductive thinking and reasoning skills.  There are many levels to the game, and is suitable for all abilities.  Everyone enjoyed it and quite a few people bought copies for their libraries.

In the afternoon Rowena Seabrook from Amnesty International spoke to us about Human Rights issues in Teen Fiction.  Her talk was thought provoking, both in how to promote and how to protect human rights of the students in the school.  There was a lot of productive discussion around LGBTQ rights and fiction, and also representation of teenagers of all races and colours in your library stock.  We all had a lot to think about after her talk.

CILIPSLG tweeted throughout the day, and a Storify of the tweets can be found here.

CILIPSLG Regional events are held throughout the year in different parts of the country.  If you are interested in attending one of our low cost events then keep an eye on this page.  If you are interested in hosting a meeting in your school, please contact SLG through their pages on the CILIP website.

 

 

How do you make a good case for your library?

We all have been there and experienced it: the utter frustration at seen a proposal for change or development turned down by your line-manager or the Headteacher. I have been at the receiving end of many refusals before I realised that something had to change in the way I was preparing my presentation. So the big question was: how can I be more persuasive next time? How can I sway the key stakeholders on my side?

This is how my personal campaign began…

In my research for a better way to change management, I have come across a number of useful resources that have made me see my problems from a different point of view or given me practical tips that I could apply in my workplace.

The first resource that has opened my eyes to other alternatives is definitely the book “The Library Marketing Toolkit” by Ned Potter (Facet Publishing). There is a fantastic website which acts as a companion to this book and which I urge to visit and explore: http://www.librarymarketingtoolkit.com/ .

Proactive vs reactive.

The chapter that has absolutely revolutionised the way I think about tackling any obstacles in my way is the “Marketing and People” one: full of tips and case studies, it really made me realise how the ability to influence people had to become my constant priority, use the the power of Word of Mouth as well as regularly reaching and outreaching. Our colleagues as well as other stakeholders in our service, big or small, can become our champions in our campaign for change. They can assist you in establishing your professional reputation and they will probably be your biggest supporters in pushing your agenda. What I really learnt in applying these priorities is that you need to constantly nourish your support network and not seek to create one just when you most need it: this will probably not come organically and support may arrive too late!

Battle Plan.

When preparing to make a change or submit a proposal for a major re-development, one model is highly recommended to ensure that you are successful: the 5 case model. The five elements of this model ensure that you are really prepared for your upcoming battle: I find it easier to see every element as an extra arrow to my bow. This model includes: The Strategic Case, The Economic case, The Financial Case, The Commercial Case, The Management Case.

If all these elements are carefully considered, investigated and analysed, you not only considerably increase your confidence in delivering your proposal but you also prepare solid grounds for your proposal to be accepted more easily.

The Strategic Case

What is the strategic context of you proposal, namely why do you want to make this change? How does this change fit within the existing structure of your organisation, including goals & strategies, existing practices and resources? Does the change that you are proposing allow the organisation to exploit new opportunities or respond to new threats?

Essential elements to be included:

  1. A clear description of what is proposed and its fit with the business strategy
  2. The key objectives to be met and benefits to be realised
  3. Key performance indicators for those objectives
  4. A resource overview

 The Economic Case

How does your proposal deliver value for money? How does your recommendation/proposal clearly provide a return on investment? How does the option that you are proposing deliver better that the other options considered?

Essential elements to be included:

  1. Critical assessment of the options considered, including cost-benefit analysis of each option: for example, a risk impact assessment of each option.
  2. A final recommendation based on a balance of cost, benefit and risk

 The Financial Case

How affordable is your proposal? How will it be funded and to what extent can your business/organisation afford it?

Essential elements to be included:

  1. Total cost of your proposal
  2. Impact upon cash flow
  3. Source of funding
  4. Possible considerations regarding the business affordability gap. If this is the case, considerations about borrowing additional finances and at what rate.
  5. Analysis of the split between revenue and capital expenditure

 The Commercial Case

What is the commercial viability of your proposal? How will you source and ensure a steady and secure supply of the commercial elements of your proposal?

Essential elements to be included:

  1. Identification and sources of the required internal and external resources
  2. How continuity of supply of those resources is to be maintained

 The Management Case

How will the proposal be project-managed to successful completion?

Essential elements to be included:

  1. Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities
  2. Delivery plan, including contingency plan, progress reporting and evaluation procedures

 

 

What better way for a sociable bookworm to spend an afternoon?

CFAE LITTERAIRE MEDLEY

The welcoming surroundings of the Grafton’s upper room were the perfect setting for the second SLG Café Littéraire. Authors, Librarians and Publishers shared enthusiasms and information over tea, coffee and some excellent cake.

The event was attended by 16 authors and a handful of publishers from Pea Green Boat Books and Usborne: Michele Simonsen – Sarah Sky –  Keren David –  Hilary Freeman  – Chitra Soundar – Larisa Villar Hauser –  Annette Smith –  Faye Bird  – Margaret Bateson-Hill  – Peter Bunzl  – Sally Kindberg  – Bridget Marzo –  Bybreen Samuels  – Jo Franklin 

From picture novel illustrators to YA writers, from well-established and loved names to first-time novelists, conversations quickly turned to the challenges of Children’s and YA literature that we are all facing.

Amongst all these discussions, some topics stood out for relevance and scope of interest across all reading ages: for example, illustration and visual literacy – how important it is to avoid the misconception that comics are a genre and not a separate medium of telling stories; a complex reading process is necessary to decipher them, such as inferring meaning, and linking text and picture. We spoke of the kind of stories we loved as children, and whether the same stories and styles of telling are still popular. Can books help our children to face the challenges of ubiquitous social media, or relieve the pressures that our very sexualised society can create? If writers want to engage with young people, is swearing necessary? One author found that putting ‘blast’ in a book for teenagers to avoid censure from their parents, just made her look out-of-touch and irrelevant.

Here are some interesting articles on these subjects:

Why teens in books can’t swear by James/Juno Dawson:

YA Books That Will Make You Swear Off Social Media Forever

“Clean Reads” List –  interesting booklist for the guidance given regarding “inappropriate” content. Food for thought.

Visual literacy: to comics or not to comics? Promoting literacy using comics

Learning To Read From Comics: Comics As Gateways To Literacy 

It was enormous fun – with serious intent – we were there to share and learn, and everyone had experience, insight or information to contribute.

In fact, our pleasant afternoon at the Grafton was almost exactly like the definition of ‘un Café Littéraire’ found in Wikipedia: a place to meet in order to talk about literature, exchange ideas, listen to book excerpts and take part in intellectual plays, all whilst enjoying coffee or another drink.* Although we did not include readings, I think that would be an excellent addition to the event, and if anyone is up for acting in an intellectual play – please let us know!

*Not that I use Wikipedia as a matter of course, but in some cases it is really rather good!

* [Un café littéraire est un lieu de réunion où l’on parle de littérature, échange des idées, écoute des extraits de livres lus par des comédiens, assiste à des spectacles érudits tout en dégustant un café, ou autre boisson.]

Penny Swan

[Librarian – The Grey Coat Hospital School ; Hon. Secretary CILIP SLG London & SE]

Café Littéraire – Saturday 23rd January 2016 – The Grafton Arms NW5

Café Littéraire

Tea and conversation flowed freely on Saturday afternoon as we enjoyed  Tea & Tattle ‘s pleasant surroundings, scrummy food and an opportunity to chat with authors and other lovers of children’s books.

Author Sufiya Ahmed with trainer Anne Harding and CILIP SLG's Barbara Ferramosca.
Author Sufiya Ahmed with trainer Anne Harding and CILIP SLG’s Barbara Ferramosca.

Inclusivity was a major topic of the day, as ‘diversity superhero’ Anna McQuinn, Sufiya Ahmed (Secrets of the Henna Girl) and trainer Anne Harding got together to put the world of children’s book publishing to rights!  Don’t miss Anna’s seminal blog on how recognition of this vital issue led her to found independent inclusive publisher Alanna Books and Anne’s recent post with links to copious book recommendations.

What are you playing at A copy of What Are You Playing At? by  Marie-Sabine Roger, published by Alanna Books will make the perfect centrepiece for a Diversity Week display.

Ancestors

Highlights from the eleven years Paul Crooks spent researching his Afro-Caribbean roots were fascinating, particularly the mixture of dedication and sheer luck that led to his eventual success.  A copy of  Ancestors, his fictionalised version of the personal history he uncovered will be a great addition to the shelves.   Extremely knowledgeable on Britain’s transatlantic slave trade he will also address KS3 students and 6th Form.

Tamsyn Murray shared highlights from her recently published Completely Cassidy 2  - Star ReporterCompletely Cassidy: Star Reporter.  A second episode in the hectic, Year 7 life of Cassidy Bond, subject of Tamsyn’s popular and very funny series for pre-teens.

Devil in the Corner by Patricia Elliot

Patricia Elliott talked to us about teaching children’s literature, her current plans and the breadth of her work to date.  Promoting her brand new Connie Carew mystery The House of Eyes published just this month,  The Devil in the Corner a Victorian, gothic, murder mystery from last year and not forgetting, of course, her popular, romantic Pimpernelles series set during the French Revolution.

Mark of Cain

Lindsey Barraclough treated us to a glimpse of the creative process behind her atmospheric tale of witchcraft from last year, Mark of Cain.  Hugely popular with KS4, it is her second story set the village of Bryers Guerdon and begins a few years after Carnegie Award nominated Long Lankin.    

Finally, it was also a pleasure to meet Amanda Lillywhite and learn more about the life of an illustrator, her styles, work in magazines, brochures, posters and educational books and particularly her online webcomics.

All in all, a very pleasant and informative afternoon, and a format that we hope to repeat very soon!

Authors Tamsyn Murray, Anna McQuinn, Sufiya Ahmed and Paul Crooks at Tea & Tattle on Saturday

Authors Tamsyn Murray, Anna McQuinn, Sufiya Ahmed and Paul Crooks at Tea & Tattle on Saturday